ArbNet.org is the online community for arboreta
 

Welcome to ArbNet, the interactive community of arboreta. On future visits to this home page, you'll find arboreta featured from The Morton Register, as well as other enhancements. This website will evolve -- and much of that depends on how you use the site. In addition to the database of arboreta (The Morton Register), there are sections for user interaction, news, events, and resources, such as an accreditation program for arboreta. Please click through and become familiar with this site and what it has to offer you and our shared community of arboreta!

Barton Arboretum and Nature Preserve of Medford Leas Awarded Level I Accreditation

Barton Arboretum and Nature Preserve of Medford Leas has been awarded a Level I Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the arboretum tells their story:

The Barton Arboretum and Nature Preserve of Medford Leas is a unique blend of accessible public gardens, collections, and preserved natural areas set amidst Medford Leas, a nonprofit community for those 55 and older that is guided by Quaker principles. Spanning more than 200 acres, the Arboretum offers visitors a diverse horticultural array of designed gardens, landscaped grounds, meadows, natural woodlands and wetlands, and extensive plant collections, including plants native to southern New Jersey.

"The ArbNet accreditation provides a benchmark to assess our strengths as well as to identify areas for future development of the Barton Arboretum and Nature Preserve of Medford Leas," said Jane K. Weston, Director of Development and Community Relations at Medford Leas. "Residents and staff of Medford Leas have long been proud of our Arboretum, and the ArbNet accreditation serves as recognition of the work we have done over the years. We are proud to have attained this designation and to be in the company of so many well-regarded arboreta."

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Connecticut College Arboretum Awarded Level III Accreditation

Connecticut College Arboretum has been awarded a Level III Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the arboretum tells their story:

Connecticut College exists in a singular environment known as the Connecticut College Arboretum, which offers a quality of life and a conservation classroom unique among liberal arts institutions. The Arboretum's very diverse 770 acres include the landscaped grounds of the College campus as well as the surrounding plant collections, natural areas and managed landscapes. These resources all support the College's mission of preparing the next generation of citizen-leaders, whose diverse responsibilities will include crafting a sustainable relationship with the natural world. Our institution distinguishes itself by a long-standing commitment to conservation and supporting research and teaching in ecological and environmental studies. The symbiosis of the Program in Environmental Studies, the Goodwin-Niering Center for the Environment and the Arboretum provides an outstanding model of an ethically and environmentally sound community.

The College has three major plant collections: the Campus Landscape with 120 acres of trees and shrubs from around the world; the Native Plant Collection, 30 acres of woody plants and wildflowers indigenous to eastern North America; and the three-acre Caroline Black Garden with a diversity of woody plants, many quite mature, in a garden setting. Professional curatorial techniques, such as mapping, inventories, labeling and computer databases, are used to keep track of the thousands of specimens now part of the Arboretum Collections. Labeled plants, guided tours, workshops and publications are part of the collection interpretation program.

All of the College property is available for teaching and research in environmental studies, the biological sciences and other academic programs. At least 30 different college courses utilize the Arboretum. The College aims to create a "living laboratory" that stimulates environmental awareness in students and those working at or visiting Connecticut College.

More than 200 acres are dedicated as Natural Area, lands kept as free as possible from human disturbance, and specifically available for observational research, teaching and recreation. Another 200 acres are available for manipulative projects, such as controlled burning experiments and vegetation management demonstrations. These lands have a rich tradition of long- and short-term ecological research by faculty and students.

 ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Oak Lawn Cemetery Association Awarded Level I Accreditation

The Oak Lawn Cemetery Association has been awarded a Level I Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the arboretum tells their story:

The Oak Lawn Cemetery Association is a non-sectarian cemetery located on a 100 acre natural setting in the town of Fairfield, Connecticut. The cemetery, about to celebrate its 150th anniversary, was founded in 1865. Its name resulted from a fortunate coincidence: in the nineteenth century, Americans regarded the oak and the acorn as symbols of immortality and, by chance, across the street from the cemetery entrance towered a stately oak tree. Subsequent generations would know it as the "Cemetery Oak". The founders thought the name a logical choice. It was their intention that the grounds serve as a botanical garden in the sense that, while it was to be a natural place, it was to be a carefully designed place, a planned landscape, what landscape architects then called a "lawn park cemetery".

As early as 1907, at the urging of Mable Osgood Wright, a naturalist and founder of the Connecticut Audubon Society, a program was undertaken by the Board of Directors to improve and beautify the cemetery grounds, beginning with the planting of Oak trees along the bank of the Mill River. Since that time the ensuing Directors of Oak Lawn Cemetery have perpetuated this program including a long-range plan for the preservation and propagation of its plantings in order to enhance its park-like setting, not only for the benefit of its deceased residents and their families but also for the enjoyment and education of the general public.

In conjunction with the Arbor Day Foundation and the Yale School of Forestry, Oak Lawn has initiated a public educational program including an annual tree planting tutorial event and supervised nature walks. We have also begun participation in aiding reforestation in our national parks through the Arbor Day Foundation by participating in their Trees in Memory program. For every person who is interred in our grounds we will plant a tree in their memory in our nation's forests. This will amount to approximately 200 trees annually. Our specimen identification program is being expanded to include the woody plants in our collection and our gardens have been recently upgraded to integrate with a honey bee apiary currently maintained on our grounds as part of a public educational program about the role of honey bees in the pollination of trees and plants.

 ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Montgomery Botanical Center Awarded Level IV Accreditation

The Montgomery Botanical Center has been awarded a Level IV Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the arboretum tells their story:

Montgomery Botanical Center: Advancing research, conservation and education through living plant collections!

A nonprofit botanic garden established in 1959, Montgomery Botanical Center keeps living specimens from wild plant populations worldwide. Emphasizing palms and cycads, the population-based, documented, scientific collections are available for study in Montgomery's 120-acre botanical garden of exemplary design.

Montgomery Botanical Center (originally The Montgomery Foundation) was established by Nell Montgomery Jennings in memory of her husband, Colonel Robert H. Montgomery, and his love of palms and cycads. Today, Montgomery Botanical Center advances botanical research, conserves rare species, and educates the community through workshops, lectures, publications, and tours of its scientific plant collections.

The mission of MBC is to advance science, education, conservation, and horticultural knowledge of tropical plants, emphasizing palms and cycads, and to exemplify excellent botanical garden design. Through this mission, MBC endeavors to make the Montgomery name known and respected throughout the world in the field of plant science.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

The Harold L. Lyon Arboretum Awarded Level IV Accreditation

The Harold L. Lyon Arboretum has been awarded a Level IV Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the arboretum tells their story:

The University of Hawai'i at Mānoa is one of only 32 institutions nationwide to hold the distinction of being a land‐, sea‐, and space‐grant research institution, and the only university in the United States that owns and operates a botanical garden in a tropical rainforest. The Harold L. Lyon Arboretum is located on 193 acres in upper Mānoa Valley, O'ahu, and maintains a world‐renowned collection of more than 5,000 plant taxa primarily from Hawai'i, and the sub‐tropical and tropical areas of the world. The plant collections are diverse, and include living specimens that range from common to extremely rare in their native habitat, as well as tropical ornamentals and economically and culturally important crop plants.

The Lyon Arboretum was originally established as the Mānoa Arboretum in 1918 by the Hawai'i Sugar Planters Association primarily for the purpose of watershed research. Since 1970, the Lyon Arboretum has become a full service public outreach facility whose mission is "to increase the appreciation of the unique flora of Hawai'i and the tropics, by conserving, curating, and studying plants and their habitats; providing inclusive educational opportunities; encouraging use by the broader community; and supporting the educational, scientific, and service activities of the University of Hawai'i."

Lyon Arboretum's research emphasis on conservation biology and horticultural specialization has led to the development of its Hawaiian Rare Plant Program (HRPP) which, for over 20 years, has focused on the rescue and recovery of Hawai'i's most critically endangered native plants through the use of micropropagation. In the late 1990s, the program expanded to include research on seed storage behavior of native Hawaiian plant species, and in 2000 began to formally initiate long-term seed storage with the creation of the Seed Conservation Laboratory.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

The University of Northern Colorado Campus Arboretum Awarded Level I Accreditation

The Universityof Northern Colorado Arboretum has been awarded a Level I Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the arboretum tells their story:

Located in Greeley, Colorado, the University of Northern Colorado Campus Arboretum is set on a 250-acre campus. As the university celebrates its 125th birthday, designation as an Accredited Arboretum reflects the dreams of the First President, Dr. Zachariah Snyder and Landscape Architect Hans Hockbaum (of Cornell University).

 Established in 1889, UNC fosters education about the science, beauty and importance of water conservation in this semi-arid North American region. The Campus Arboretum displays a collection of plants native to the Front Range region of Colorado and also of ecosystems around the world. Open to the public, the Campus Arboretum encompasses the grounds of many historic and contemporary buildings, displaying and interpreting its woody plant collections in a manner that reveals a sense of place in Northern Colorado. The historic landscape features more than 3,700 trees and hundreds of different woody plants with some heritage trees more than 100 years old. 

Over its 125-year history, UNC has been dedicated to its campus landscape, and its collections, displays, tree trails, and activities—as well as its commitment to environmental sustainability—help the Campus Arboretum enrich campus as a showplace and a home for all its students, staff, faculty and visitors.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

The Newport Arboretum Awarded Level I Accreditation

The Newport Arboretum has been awarded a Level I Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how The Newport Arboretum tells their story:

The city of Newport, Rhode Island is a living museum of American history, and our botanical heritage is no small part of our story. During the Gilded Age, collectors, scientists and amateur horticulturists planted our city with an incredible array of specimen trees, many of which were gathered by tree hunters from across the globe.

The Newport Tree Society was founded in 1987 when concerned citizens recognized the fact that our once-legendary urban forest was clearly aging and ailing. For the first time since the end of the Gilded Age, Newport's public trees began to benefit from formal planning and active regeneration efforts via a comprehensive tree protection and management plan. The majority of the city's finest specimen trees, however, are found on private landscapes. In response to the challenge of restoring a forest under the direct care of thousands of private citizens, the Newport Tree Society outlined a new citizen-centered model for citywide reforestation centered around The Newport Arboretum, New England's first citywide arboretum, established in 2011.

The heart of this reforestation plan lies in heritage horticulture, the celebration of our city's long history of exploratory arboriculture and its remaining core of historic designed landscapes and plant collections. From handwritten records of expansive colonial-era hothouses that held specimens from all over the globe, to the scores of Gilded Age landscapes still in cultivation on our island today, Newport is a truly a jewel of American horticulture and landscape architecture. Our goal is to remember and reignite our once burning passion for sylviculture by reforesting all four corners of our city with truly special specimen trees planted by private citizens on both public and private property.

Ultimately, we seek to create a citywide arboretum with collections unparalleled in scope and depth — and to do so by designing and implementing sustainable processes that may one day be modeled by communities across the globe.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Wesleyan College Arboretum Awarded Level I Accreditation

The Wesleyan College Arboretum has been awarded a Level I Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the Wesleyan College Arboretum tells their story:

The Wesleyan College Arboretum is a 104-acre preserve devoted to education, research, and conservation. The forest that is now designated the Wesleyan College Arboretum has been part of historic Wesleyan College's campus since the college moved from its original 1836 location in downtown Macon to its current location in 1928. Located right on the boundary between the Piedmont and the Coastal Plain in the middle of Georgia, the Wesleyan College Arboretum boasts a rich floristic diversity typical of a southern temperate zone forest, with about 105 native species of trees, shrubs, and woody vines. The second-growth forest is dominated by oaks, hickories, and loblolly pine, with a smattering of southern magnolia, flowering dogwood, and beech.

Designation of the 104-acre forest as an "Arboretum" in 1997 helped elevate the status of the forest, and more attention was given to maintaining the trails and using the Arboretum for teaching and research. Since 2010, however, the pace has quickened. An influx of donations and grant money has allowed for the construction of a pavilion and fire circle, development of new trails, upgrades to the rustic Anderson cabin, large-scale removal of invasive plants (privet, thorny olive, and wisteria) and restoration of native trees and shrubs. Finally, with the development of engaging public programs and events, and the labeling of plants in the Arboretum, we qualify for accreditation, a milestone that the Arboretum Committee has been working toward for over fifteen years.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Taltree Arboretum & Gardens Awarded Level III Accreditation

The Taltree Arboretum & Gardens has been awarded a Level III Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the Taltree Arboretum & Gardens tells their story:

Taltree Arboretum & Gardens is a 360-acre, dog-friendly oak preserve of formal gardens, woodlands, wetlands and prairies that offers a variety of educational and outdoor experiences. The arboretum encompasses one of the most diverse collections of oak species in the nation and has created a safe haven for many rare plant and animal species through its restoration of the Northwest Indiana native landscape.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Basalt Midland Arboretum Awarded Level I Accreditation

The Basalt Midland Arboretum has been awarded a Level I Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the Basalt Midland Arboretum tells their story:

The town of Basalt is a small community nestled in the central Rocky Mountains between juniper-pinon woodlands to the north and to the south lie the confluence of the Roaring Fork and Frying Pan Rivers, which flow through the heart of town. Basalt's rich and storied history is shaped by the Colorado Midland Railway when in November of 1887 the tracks were laid down First Street, now Midland Avenue. The railroad whistles no longer in the Basalt air as cars, bicycles and pedestrians make their way through town.

The Basalt Midland Arboretum is contained within the town's parks, open space and rights of way and has catalogued 168 species of trees and shrubs. Our horticulture and forestry staff is dedicated to the practice and advancement of sustainable land stewardship and promoting ecological conservation principals in public horticulture and arboriculture in managing the town's ninety gardens and three thousand trees. Our staff leads guided tours of the gardens which focus on creating and maintaining desirable, thriving and water-wise landscapes that provide a continual season of bloom in our semi-arid mountain climate. Our elevation is 6624'.

Basalt's landscapes instill a quiet and appealing aesthetic that touches the lives of its community and visitors every day and it is this important community asset that we preserve and protect for our future generations.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Agnes Scott Arboretum Awarded Level I Accreditation

The Agnes Scott Arboretum has been awarded a Level I Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the Agnes Scott Arboretum tells their story:

The Agnes Scott Arboretum is an extension and reflection of the liberal arts curriculum of Agnes Scott College, a historic college for women in Atlanta, Georgia. Since 1889, Agnes Scott College has educated women to think deeply, live honorably, and engage the intellectual and social challenges of their times. Its 100-acre campus is home to more than 2000 trees, which contribute greatly to its reputation as one of the most beautiful colleges in the country. Some of its notable trees were donated by alumnae and planted by members of the faculty, staff, and student body.

The arboretum was established in 2012 to encourage people to reflect on the complex associations between trees and humans and on the integral role that trees play in our lives. Its growing catalog of trees has been organized by interdisciplinary themes derived from the college's curriculum: for example, trees in the arts, trees as carbon sinks, biodiversity, tree structure in human thought, psychological benefits of trees, and many more. The arboretum makes optimal use of digital technology to connect visitors via smart devices to a website, where they can read or listen to explanations of the various topics. Each "location" in the arboretum, physical and virtual, is carefully designed to educate visitors about a key concept, focus on a single tree species, and highlight some aspect of the college itself. For example, a stand of eastern hemlocks (Tsuga canadensis) near the college's interfaith chapel serves as the centerpiece of a short history of sacred trees.

The Agnes Scott Arboretum is already drawing heightened attention, both on campus and off, to the priceless asset that is the college's tree canopy. Recently designated as a Tree Campus USA by the Arbor Day Foundation, Agnes Scott College is now partnering with the U.S. Forest Service's Centers for Urban and Interface Forestry on an innovative, six-month audit of every component in the college's urban forest management program. It is the hope of the arboretum's supporters that, in the years to come, the Agnes Scott Arboretum will help recruit and inspire successive generations of tree advocates, who will ensure that the college never loses its distinction as a wooded oasis in the midst of the sprawling city of Atlanta.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Ed Leuck Louisiana Academic Arboretum Awarded Level II Accreditation

Ed Leuck Louisiana Arboretum has been awarded a Level II Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how Ed Leuck Louisiana Academic Arboretum tells their story:

The Ed Leuck Louisiana Academic Arboretum is located in Shreveport, Louisiana, at the center of the Centenary College of Louisiana campus. The area of the arboretum covers approximately three acres of the campus and remains free and open to the public 24 hours a day, all year round.

The Arboretum was established in 1984, at the behest of Harry Balcom, college Board of Trustees member, and Donald Webb, the college President, with Mr. Balcom providing the necessary funds. The present arboretum site was chosen both for its proximity to foot traffic and its poor physical condition. Construction of a dam to ensure a permanent aquatic habitat, the installation of sprinklers and the layout and carving of a system of walking paths were completed in the fall of 1984. The first plantings were made by Professor Ed Leuck in the spring of 1985. Plants have subsequently been continuously added. In recent years, as trees and shrubs become larger, the addition of woody plants to the collection has slowed, and more attention is now given to observing and encouraging diversity in the herbaceous component. The Arboretum collection comprises 190 woody native plant species, 14 woody exotic plant species, and more than 70 non-woody native plant species.

The collection of the Arboretum is intended to serve both an aesthetic purpose and an educational purpose. Campus beautification was the initial motivating force behind the establishment of the Arboretum. The idea was to make a poorly vegetated slope aesthetically pleasing, while also using this same area of the campus as a test garden for plantings elsewhere on campus. With its founding, the Arboretum was also meant to serve a teaching purpose, both for Centenary College classes as well as the local community. The original Arboretum director, Professor Ed Leuck, intended to showcase native species of the southeast, with a special push for those native to northwest Louisiana. The carefully labeled woody and non-woody plants help members of the campus community and campus visitors appreciate the richness of native species.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  
 

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ArbNet

ArbNet is an online, interactive community of arboreta that supports the common purposes and interests of tree-focused public gardens. More. ArbNet is sponsored and coordinated by The Morton Arboretum; inquiries to ArbNet@mortonarb.org.

Morton Register of Arboreta

The Morton Register of Arboreta is a comprehensive list and database of arboreta and other public gardens that have a substantial focus on woody plants. More. Accreditation for arboreta is also available. Sponsored and coordinated by The Morton Arboretum (www.mortonarb.org).

What is an Arboretum?

An arboretum is a specialized type of botanical garden that focuses on trees and other woody plants. More. A principal goal of arboreta is to encourage and support the planting and conservation of trees.
 
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